Photographs by courtesy of the Tourism Council of Bhutan

Click to play Bhutanese music:

Artist: Jigme Drukpa Title: ‘Thrung Thrung Karmoi Lu’ from CD: ‘Endless Songs of Bhutan’

Courtesy link: Bhutanese music can be sampled and downloaded through our Bookstore.

Bhutan is a biodiversity hotspot, one of the last remaining in the world; forest cover has now increased to over 72% of the country, with 60% of the country under protection.

Bhutan is a biodiversity hotspot for flora and fauna:

The array of flora and fauna available in Bhutan is unparalleled due to conservation and its wide altitudinal and climatic range. Physically, the country can be divided into three zones:

1. Alpine Zone (4000m and above) with no forest cover;
2. Temperate Zone (2000 to 4000m) with conifer or broadleaf forests;
3. Subtropical Zone (150m to 2000m) with Tropical or Subtropical vegetation.

Bhutan is a biodiversity hotspot for forest types:

Forest types in Bhutan are fir forests, mixed conifer forest, blue pine forest, chirpine forest, broadleaf mixed with conifer, upland hardwood forest, lowland hardwood forest, and tropical lowland forests. Almost 60% of the plant species found in the eastern Himalayan region are present in Bhutan.

Bhutan is a biodiversity hotspot for plants:

Bhutan boasts about 300 species of medicinal plants and about 46 species of rhododendrons. Some common sights for the visitors are the magnolias, junipers, orchids of varied hues, gentian, medicinal plants, Daphne, giant rhubarb, the blue and trees such as fir, pine and oaks.

Bhutan is a biodiversity hotspot for endangered animals:

A wide range of rare and endangered animals can be found frequenting the dense jungles and high mountains of Bhutan. Due to the country’s conservation efforts and its unspoiled natural environment Bhutan supports thriving populations of some of the rarest animals on earth and has thus been classified as one of the last biodiversity hotspots in the world.

Bhutan is a biodiversity hotspot for high altitude animals:

Some high altitude species are the snow leopards, Bengal tigers that are found at altitudes ranging from 3000 to 4000 meters, the red panda, the gorals and the langurs, the Himalayan black bear, sambars, wild pigs, barking deer, blue sheep and musk deer.

In the tropical forests of Southern Bhutan one can come across clouded leopards, the one horned rhinoceros, elephants, water buffaloes and swamp deer. You can even find the Golden Langur, a species of monkey that is unique to Bhutan.

Bhutan is a biodiversity hotspot and:

As one of the ten global hotspots, Bhutan is committed to preserve and protect its rich environment through its government and environmental organizations. This commitment is apparent in the fact that the kingdom has the distinct honor of being one of the only nations whose forest cover has actually grown over the years.

Some of the proactive organizations working in Bhutan are:

• National Environmental Commission
• Royal Society for the Protection of Nature clubs throughout the country.
• Department of Forestry Services.
• Nature Conservation Department
• Bhutan Trust Fund.
• Donor Organizations.
• Association of Bhutan Tour Operators.
• WWF